The Jinx

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So, I wanted to share a story I wrote about six years ago with you guys. I was in high school and playing around, writing some short stories trying to get a feel for my style of writing. I stumbled upon this the other day and wanted to share it with you, mostly because I didn’t have any poetry lined up for this week so i could give you a break from all the rhyming. 😉

Anyway, please enjoy this short story I wrote when I was 17. It’s not that good, but I’m thinking of revisiting it in the future and extending it. Perhaps you’ll find it on Nosleep or Creepypasta one day!

When I was a kid growing up, my friends and I used to play that game where if you said the same thing as someone else at the same time, one of you could jinx the other. Back then we never really knew where that game came from. We had always played it and never thought anything of it. There was an old superstition that we held about it too. Normally, if you had fallen prey to a jinx and had broken it, the bad luck you created would curse you. I had skipped out on answering many questions throughout elementary school because I was jinxed and was afraid to lose my luck. The only way to get released from a jinx was for the one who jinxed you to release you by saying your name.

After elementary school, my friends and I stopped playing that game. We felt childish and thought that it was dumb. On some days, one of us would jinx the other in an attempt to joke. Whoever was under the jinx would immediately speak and we would laugh it off. We never took them seriously after that. Eventually, we went off to college and grew apart, then started families of our own.

I didn’t hear the word jinx until I was a father. My boy had just turned seven and it was at his birthday party where the jinx resurfaced in my life. He and his friends were talking, they said the same thing in unison and his friend jinxed him. My boy laughed it off and began talking, when his friend started freaking out.

“No! Terry No! Don’t do that! If you break a jinx three times, she will come after you!” My son, Terry, was familiar with the rules of the jinx. But I had never heard this addition to the game. It was then that I chimed in, hoping to shield my son from any unwarranted nightmares.

“Hey, who will come after him?”  I was looking at the boy when I spoke, but he turned his head before he answered. He was afraid of whatever this woman was supposed to be.

“She will. The jinx lady. She can’t talk. Nobody knows her name. They say she comes for you if you break a jinx. It’s unfair to the kids who are obedient.” Tears started to well up in his eyes as he spoke, this kid was really shaken up about it.

“Hey, who told you that buddy? No one will come for you.” I knelt down next to him and put a hand on his shoulder as well as my son’s. “There is no lady. I’ve broken plenty of jinxes. Don’t worry.  I’m still here! Who told you about this lady?”

The boy shook his head and turned away from me. I patted his head and told him he wasn’t in trouble and then sent the boys off to go have fun. It wasn’t until I ran into that boy’s mother a few weeks after when I realized where the boy had heard that superstition from. I guess his older brother was some kind of punked out gothic kid that was obsessed with the occult. His mom said that he had brought home a book of occult mysteries one night and there was a whole section inside that talked about where popular games and superstitions came from. I didn’t care much for the other stuff she had to say, but I figured the kid had gotten that idea from the book and then told his brother, who had passed the knowledge on to my son. Terry had suffered a couple nightmares after that, so I wanted to be sure to check up on the history of the game.

I strolled to the library that evening and began looking through various occult books. After about twenty minutes in the still silence, I found the one that the mom was referring to. “Hidden Mysteries of the Occult.” Was its name. I thumbed through the pages until I found the section of the book that talked about kids’ games. The text read like this…

“Most people believe that jinxes are a fun game for kids to play. Which is rooted deeply in untruth. A jinx is actually a weak curse that you can place on someone else. It cropped up many years ago, and some witches use a jinx as a way to curse someone without hurting them. But there have been many instances of kids talking about a woman with no lips coming to them the night of the day that they broke a jinx. The most famous account was a boy who had his tongue ripped out by her. That was the story, he had broken the jinx and violated the creator of the spell. In bed that night, he was visited by a woman who reached into his mouth with her own and took his tongue from him. The boy’s parents had found him lying in bed that night, screaming and crying. Blood surrounded him and poured out of his face. The legend goes, if you break a jinx, you will never be able to speak again. There is no luck or bad luck about it. Tell your children to be careful.”

I put the book up and stepped out of the library. Unable to believe the story that the book had told. The whole thing seemed like an over the top fairy tale. Of course… that was before I found out my son had broken a jinx.

If you enjoy the blog, please consider picking up a copy of the compilation book that comes out every year. It is called the “Life is not Meant to be Awful” compilation, and volumes one and two are both out now on Amazon! With each one, I hope they inspire you, and I hope that you enjoy them. Each year is filled with wonderful stories and things to learn and I want this blog to be the place I record all of those things. Each book purchase helps fund my other projects, such as Random Acts Clothing, which is in the process of being jump started (for good this time.) But, I’ll save all of that for another time. If you’d like to pick up a copy of the “Life is not Meant to be Awful” books, I’ll leave the link for you right here! They’re only $8 a piece. It’s basically a steal. 😉

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